Behavioral Health

 Spiritual Health

Last Updated: April 27, 2020

Spirituality is often defined as a sense of connection that gives meaning and purpose to a person's life. 

Spirituality is unique to each individual, and refers to the deepest part of you.

Your spirit provides you with the revealing sense of who you are, why you are here and what your purpose for living is. It is that innermost part of you that allows you to gain strength and hope.

Technical Guide 360: Spiritual Fitness Inventory User Guide (USAPHC)

The Spiritual Fitness Inventory (SFI) is a tool to assist screeners in assessing Soldiers' spiritual fitness as a component of their resilience and readiness.  The results of the SFI can be used to facilitate a discussion related to spirituality, and to help an individual track changes in his or her spiritual fitness over time as part of a comprehensive approach to wellness and resiliency.

Boosting Resilience through Spirituality (APHC Brochure)

This brochure provides information on the benefits of spiritual fitness, spiritual fitness tips, finding a chaplain, and what leaders can do to promote tolerance alongside the practice of spirituality.

Moral Injury in the Context of War External Link by Shira Maguen, PhD and Brett Litz, PhD (Va.gov)

What is moral injury?  Like psychological trauma, moral injury is a construct that describes extreme and unprecedented life experience including the harmful aftermath of exposure to such events. Events are considered morally injurious if they "transgress deeply held moral beliefs and expectations" (1). Thus, the key precondition for moral injury is an act of transgression, which shatters moral and ethical expectations that are rooted in religious or spiritual beliefs, or culture-based, organizational, and group-based rules about fairness, the value of life, and so forth.

Talking Spiritual about Moral Injury     External Link (VA.gov)

In the context of war, moral injuries may stem from direct participation in acts of combat, such as killing or harming others, or indirect acts, such as witnessing death or dying, failing to prevent immoral acts of others, or giving or receiving orders that are perceived as gross moral violations (2). The act may have been carried out by an individual or a group, through a decision made individually or as a response to orders given by leaders.

Real Warriors - Real Battles - Real Strength External Link

Spirituality can help you feel connected to something bigger than yourself and build resilience at the same time. The Real Warriors Campaign encourages help-seeking behavior among service members, veterans and military families coping with invisible wounds.

Clergy Toolkit External Link (VA.gov)

Clergy and spiritual communities play an important role in supporting Servicemembers and Veterans in their personal well-being and spiritual health.  This toolkit was created for clergy who work with our Nation's Veterans and Servicemembers who have or are at risk for developing posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Much of what is contained here is also helpful to clergy members supporting other, non-military trauma survivors.  

Articles on Meditation and Mindfulness

Government

Non-government

Spirituality after Deployment External Link   

Veterans Administration  External Link My HealtheVet

Coming Home: Developing a Theological Response for Returning Combat Veterans External Link This site contains links to resources for OEF/OIF veterans, their Family members, caregivers and spiritual leaders, and spiritual communities.

Health Benefits of Spiritual Fitness

Non-government

Interfaith calendar   External Link

This listing shows the holidays and observances for all the major religious organizations. It includes definitions for each of the observances listed.

Military Crisis Line External Link

Call 1-800-273-8255 and press 1 for the Military Crisis Line

ARMY GI Suicide Prevention External Link

The Army G-1 Website provides many relevant, recent suicide prevention products and hyperlinks.